Tag Archive: David Rudisha


The Great North City Games up in Gateshead, Tyneside, on Saturday followed by the Great North Run from Newcastle to South Shields (13.1 miles) today provide the main athletics attraction on British soil, while the international meeting Notturna di Milano in Milan (Italy), featuring some Britons in action, and the two-day multi-venture of Decastar in Talence headlined by Tatiana Chernova , trailing Olympic champion Natalya Dobrinska in the heptathon overnight, are the most important events around the continent this weekend. So let’s start picking up the action around:

Great North City Games, Newcastle Gateshead, Saturday 17 September

A large crowd turned out in the streets of a damp Gateshead to hail Daegu hero Mo Farah on his first outing since claiming gold over 5000m in Daegu and the world champion returned the welcome home by means of a romp to an easy victory over 2 miles in 8:37.72, pulling away from American Brian Olinger in the late stages to win by over four seconds. A household name after his heroics in Korea, the Briton is enjoying large acknowledgement and deep affections among people around the country and even received a standing ovasion when recently presented to the crowd during the interval of a game of his beloved Arsenal at the Emirates.

Mo Farah wins the 2 mile race in Gateshead

That was the one of only three wins of a depleted British team against seven of an always superior American outfit that boasted the likes of Carmelita Jeter, Jason Richardson, Dwight Phillips, Bernard Lagat and Walter Dix among their ranks as Hannah England employed her trademark kick to come away from a spirited Helen Clitheroe for a convincing victory over the women’s mile in 4:39.49 to 4:40.65 respectively, a fitting follow-up on her recent exploits on the international stage.

The global 1500m silver medalist has got a further race scheduled in a road rematch against Americans Jenny Simpson and Morgan Uceny in the 5th Avenue Mile in New York on Sunday before she calls time on her season.

Jenny Meadows, on a rare outing overdistance, came a decent fourth in 4:44.99 to split the American girls behind the top two but Emma Pallant could finish only last way adrift in 4:53.45, still looking to find her way.

Harry Aikines-Ayreety and Christian Malcolm made a second one-two for Britain in the men’s dash in 10.27 and 10.45 secs respectively (1.5m/sec) ahead of makeshift sprinters Jeff Porter (Tiffany‘s husband) and Omo Osaghae, over to the flat from the high hurdles. From there on, however, it was all USA across the board.

Fresh from an electrifying 19.53 over 200m behind Yohan Blake in Brussels the previous night, Walter Dix had bundles of pace in his legs to tear away to a sizzling 14.65 secs (1.4m/sec, 10.11 through 100m) for a striking victory over the rare ‘straight’ 150m, as Marlon Devonish set a British best ever in 14.87 secs (10.19 at 100m) well behind in second. Arguably, this looks to form the Briton’s best distance on the quality of his runs over the last couple of years but such a shame he cannot translate his times into the 200m, having lost that final third that could render him a real force on international level.

Rising young American Maurice Mitchell came third in 15.08 (10.22 at 100m) and James Ellington filled the last spot in a personal best of 15.18 (10.30 at 100m).

In the women’s version, new world 100m champion Carmelita Jeter made light work to dominate in 16.50 secs (1.5m/sec, 11.31 at 100m), a world best over a ‘straight’ 150m, as Anyika Onuora (16.90, 11.42 at 100m) and Abi Oyepitan (16.98, 11.48 at 100m) trailed a long way behind, with high hurdles Olympic champion Dawn Harper deputizing over the flat in 17.19 secs (11.62 at 100m).

Jason Richardson, the new world champion, demolished a field that involved last summer’s global topper David Oliver with aplomb in a fast 13.16 secs (0.7m/sec) to wrap up a sensational season in style, the latter setting 13.36 secs for runner-up – apparently carrying a complaint though. Britain’s Andy Turner hit a hurdle hard early into the race to stumble out of contention and eventually let up off the final flight in 14.08 secs for last as William Sharman swept past in 13.82 secs.

Elsewhere, Bernard Lagat romped to an easy victory over the men’s mile in 4:06.01, Andie Osagie third in an unfamiliar outing in 4:09.53, Dawn Harper and Danielle Carruthers were a couple of gears up on the British girls in fast 12.73 and 12.77 secs over the women’s sticks (0.3m/sec) while young Holly Bleasdale struggled once again at the end of a very long season to come second over 4.12m in the pole vault, American Becky Holliday getting the win at 4.27m.

Results

http://www.greatcitygames.org/Events/Great-North-City-Games/TV.aspx

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Great North Run, Newcastle, Tyneside, Sunday 18 September

Jo Pavey has finished top Briton in fourth in 70:48 in the women’s race to set up nicely for marathon duty in a few weeks time as Helen Clitheroe followed closely home a place behind for an excellent debut of 70:57 over the distance, in particular coming on the back of a runner-up spot behind Hannah England in the mile yesterday.

Lucy Wangui Kabuu laid the ground for a Kenyan double as she totally dominated the field on the Newcastle to South Shields course to clinch victory in 67:06, shaping a well over two minures gap on following marker Jessica Augusto (POR) who posted 69:27. Another Portoguese, Marisa Barrios, was third in 70:29.

Martin Matathi (KEN) moved through the gears over the last third of the race to surge inside 59 mins for a new course record of 58:56 and thoroughly win the men’s affair from compatriot Jonathan Maiyo, who had broken away around the 5th mile but couldn’t hold on to his lead to eventually finish a distant second  in 59:27.

The Kenyans occupied all four top positions as pre-race favourite Emanuel Mutai wound up third in 59:52 and Micah Kogo was fourth in 60:03.

Keith Gerrard, 25, made a very promising debut of his own in 63:39 to move straight fourth in the UK charts this season and might as well start contemplating an earlier move up to the marathon on the evidence of this showing. The US-based runner has also made substantial headway over 10000m by means of a PB of 28:27.03 this term so a solid platform is already in place to mount a move up.

Among other Britons, Scot Freya Murray swang back into action after a long lay-off due to injury to make a strong debut of 72:44 for 10th in the women’s race while veteran Ian Hudspith ran his fastest time since 2007 in 64:14 in 15th place, former steeplechaser Matt O’Dowd (V35) drew his best time since 1999 in 64:32 for 17th, returning John Beattie ran a debut 64:50 following next and Darren Deed posted a personal best of 64:58 a further spot adrift in the men’s race.

Andy Vernon may have been slightly disappointed to come only 20th in 65:45 (SB).

Full Results

http://www.greatrun.org/Results/Default.aspx

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Decastar, Talence, France

Day I

Olympic champion Natalya Dobrynska (UKR) is mounting a slight surprise at the moment as she is leading new global champion Tatiana Chernova (RUS) by a healthy 56pts overnight, 3867 to 3811pts respectively after four disciplines.

The Russian, as expected, got to the front after the hurdles running slightly outside her PB in a 13.37 secs (-0.7m/sec, 1069pts) against a familiar modest start from her main rival in 13.76 secs (-0.5m/sec, 1013pts) for the duo to come tied at 1.82m out of the high jump (1003pts).

But Dobrynska bided her time to strike back through a SB of 16.28m (947pts) in the shot that, combined with a poor effort of 12.90m by Chernova (721pts), propelled her to a sound lead of 170pts after the third stop of the heptathlon. However, another modest trip round 200m in 24.80 secs (0.0, 904pts) had her advantage curtailed down to just 56pts at the end of the first day as Chernova was substantially faster in 23.61 secs (-0.7m/sec, 1018) in her heat.

Rather surprisingly, Jessica Zelinka (CAN) is not that far off in third on 3752pts with Karolina Tyminska (POL) fourth on 3706pts.

In the decathlon, favourite Leonel Suarez (CUB) is stuttering way down in eighth on just 3925 after a horrid first day (11.43, 7.18, 13.24, 1.97, 49.39) and will need to call up on his deepest reserves if he is to turn around a nasty situation of a 290pts deficit on overnight leader Andres Raja (EST) on 4215pts.

Day I Results & Standings

http://www.iaaf.org/wce11/results/eventCode=4742/sex=W/discCode=HEP/combCode=hash/roundCode=4/summary.html#det

Day II

Natalya Dobrynska‘s challenge and potential upset quickly fizzled out into the second day to open the way to Tatiana Chervona for a comfortable victory in the end on an eventual total of 6679pts, the Ukrainian still pulling together a SB of 6539pts.

The Russian actually didn’t even need to reach her best form as a 6.57m (1.8m/sec, 1030pts) leap proved enough to turn round a 56pts deficit into a 28pts advantage from the off since Dobrynska faltered at just 6.31m (1.8m/sec, 946pts) in the long jump.

And it was as good as game over when the world champion landed her spear at 50.62m (872pts) to settle matters in the javelin with her rival unable to go further than 47.40m (810pts), rendering the tail-end 800m a virtual lap of honour as Chernova sailed through in 2:09.92 to wrap up her third straight multi-eventer win – the Ukrainian crossing the line in 2:13.42.

Karolina Tyminska came third on 6301pts through a strong ending of a 2:06.51 over 800m and Canadian Jessica Zelinka was fourth on 6296pts.

Over to the decathlon, Leonel Suarez could make no ground nor improve on a dismal opening day to end up a mere seventh on a vastly disappointing 7889pts as Hans van Alphen (BEL) came through from behind to snatch victory by a mere 16pts out of the hands of Mikk Pahapill (EST) at the death, running narrowly outside his PB in 4:21.10 for 804 and a total of 8200pts against the latter’s much slower 4:38.43 (690pts) to a final tally of 8184pts.

Results

http://www.iaaf.org/wce11/results/eventCode=4742/index.html

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Notturna di Milano, Milan, Italy, September 18

Luke Fagan and Leon Baptiste‘s hopes of fast times over the dash in Milan were blown away by a strong headwind of -3.4m/sec down the home straight, as well as pouring rain, to strive home in 10.57 and 10.65 secs for second and fifth respectively, although the former may be content enough to have placed runner-up behind new Jamaican star Nickel Ashmeade (9.96) who crossed the line in 10.42 secs.

Apparently, that was Fagan’s last piece of action to a breakthrough season while Baptiste will be likely running one more race over his specialty, the 200m, in Watford midweek.

Chris Clarke fared much better than in Brussels two days ago to come runner-up in 46.29 over 400m not far off winner Oscar Pistorius (RSA), who sneaked inside 46 secs to a time of 45.97.

In the men’s 1500m, Kenyan Silas Kiplagat was rampant to storm to a devastating victory by around four and a half seconds in 3:33.28 over a field that involved former world champion Yussuf Saad Kamel, the son of great Billy Konchellah (KEN), who is still working his way back and ended up fourth in a 3:39.05.

James Brewer came home in the middle of the field in eighth in a SB of 3:41.10 but will be satisfied to have claimed the scalp of Spaniard Arturo Casado who finished a place behind in 3:41.86.

Mohammed Amman stuns mighty David Rudisha down the home straight on a damp track

The highlight of the meeting belonged without a doubt to late season’s revelation Mohammed Amman (ETH) who forced mighty world record holder David Rudisha into his first defeat over 800m in two years, edging narrowly ahead in the dying stages to a fast 1:43.50 against the Kenyan’s 1:43.57. A massive win and confidence boost for the 17-year-old Ethiopian who emerges as a force to reckon with in view of the London Olympics next summer.

Olha Saladuha (UKR) carved out arguably the other top display of the meeting as she reached out to a slightly windy 14.94m (2.4m/sec) in the triple jump to comfortably hold off second-placed Olga Rypakova (KAZ), who achieved a best of 14.69 (2.8m/sec) on the day, while Anna Chicherova (RUS) cleared 1.96m to edge out home favourite Antonietta di Martino (1.93) in the women’s high jump.

Results

http://www.dbresults.net/sitof/risultati/at/2011/Milano1809201101/at/indexframe.htm

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Meeting International Tangier, Morocco, Sunday 18 September

Dwain Chambers edged out local record holder Ouhadi Aziz to a useful international win in the men’s 100m in 10.28 to 10.32 secs (-0.4m/sec), Lerone Clarke (JAM) last in a dismal 10.84 secs (injured?), and came back later to take third on a first, and probably last, showing over the longest sprint in 20.86 secs (-0.1m/sec) some way behind winner Ainsley Waugh‘s meet record of 20.71 secs, Aziz marginally second in 20.85 secs.

Jemma Simpson was a convincing winner in the women’s 800m in 2:02.21 but had to wait for a while to learn of her time as the clock stopped at 1:52 during the last stages of the race – that would have been an awesome world record!

The overall outlook of displays on the track and the infield ranged on a moderate trail apart from Canadian Dylan Armstrong‘s 21.76m to win the men’s shot from Portoguese Fortes Marco (20.61) and former world champion Christian Cantwell (20.58), suggesting that conditions may have not been very performance conductive.

Results

http://www.meetingdetanger.ma/2011-live.cfm

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IAAF Race Walking Challenge Final, La Coruna, Spain, Saturday 17 September

Long-unbeaten Valerie Borchin and Olga Kaniskina (RUS), the world champions over the men and women’s 20km in Daegu, took their form to the streets of La Coruna in Spain and dominated the respective 10km races at the Race Walking Challenge Final with relative ease.

Borchin always maintained a firm hold on the men’s affair and was barely threatened at any point to claim a convincing win, along with a $30,000 prize, in a huge SB of 38:42 ahead of China’s Zhang Wang (38:49, SB), who finished just outside the medals in Daegu, and Wafei Chu (39:06, SB).

For her part, Kaniskina upped the ante in the late stages to pull well clear of Daegu’s silver medalist Hong Liu (CHN) to an eventual 42:37 (SB), placing a good 17 secs distance between herself and her rival.

Results

Men 1.Valerie Borchin (RUS) 38:42 (SB), 2.Zhang Wang (CHN) 38:49 (SB), 3.Wafei Chu (CHN) 39:06 (SB), 4.Joao Vieira (POR) 39:09 (SB), 5.Eder Sanchez (MEX) 39:13 (SB), …, 10.Jared Tallent (AUS) 39:48

Women 1.Olga Kaniskina (RUS) 42:37 (SB), 2.Hong Liu (CHN) 42:54 (SB), 3.Melanie Seeger (GER) 43:06 (SB), 4.Ana Capacinha (POR) 43:12 (PB), 5.Susana Feitor (POR) 43:37 (SB)

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BAL Qualifier, Abingdon, Saturday 17 September

Merwyn Luckwell has returned to the top of the British javelin after two years as he released an Olympic B qualifier of 80.60m in Abingdon, showing that he is totally over the long-term injury problems that blighted him since 2009. That mark was the farthest by a Brit since his own PB of 81.05m two years ago to move past James Campbell, a SB of 80.18 back in May, to the top of the UK rankings in the process.

There was further good news from the javelin quarters at the bow-out of the season as U20 Richard Shuttleworth improved to a PB of 71.61m behind Luckwell, scratching his former figure of 70.73m in qualification at the European U20 Championships in Tallinn (Estonia). Both throwers are coached by Esa Utriainen.

Mick Woods-coached Charlie Purdue continued her tentative return to action in a 10:04.1 low-key race over 3000m having missed the bulk of the summer following surgery in May.

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English Schools Combined Events Championships, Exeter, September 17-18

18-year-old Liam Ramsey worked up a new U20 best total ever of 7308 pts during a two-day adventure in the decathlon across the weekend in Exeter, to move up from his previous figure of 7233pts in Doncaster back in June. His card read 11.46w (4.6m/sec) in the 100m, 6.94m (2.6m/sec) in the long jump, 13.74m in the shot (6kgr), 1.96m in the high jump (ePB), 49.26 secs over 400m, 14.46 over the junior sticks (PB, 1.2m/sec), 37.66m in the discus, 4.03m in the pole vault, 43.75m in the javelin and rounded out in 4:33.44 in the 1500m.

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The last major athletics event of the summer on British soil, shaping the main stage in the last act of the qualification process for places on the British team to Daegu, has arrived and there will be a packed two days of top-level star-set action staged at Crystal Palace, featuring the likes of David Rudisha, David Oliver, Phillips Idowu, Bernard Lagat, Mo Farah, Angelo Taylor, Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Sanya Richards-RossCarmelita Jeter, and Barbora Spotakova. So let’s have a look through the schedule of the first day and pick up some of the  most interesting stories and characters today moving top-down, that is from the end of the day backwards.

Men’s 3000m

I speculate that Mo Farah could be out to gain hold of David Moorcroft‘s last-standing British record of 7:32.79, set on this very track way back in 1982, and provide the ‘crescendo’ at the end of the first day as well as getting a good sharperner under his belt as the make-up of the race suggests.

There is Kenyan Mark Kosgei Kiptoo to provide a good challenge, a SB of 12:59.91 over 5000m, and an excellent pacemaker in American David Krumenacher while breakthrough Aussie Ben StLawrence, who ran 27:24.95 over 10000m at Stanford in May, reliable Irishman Alastair Cragg and also Kenyan Sammy Alex Mutahi to add quality to the field, though the latter is nowhere near his last summer 13:00.12 form at the moment.

But this is definitely not a top-tier tussle by any means and Mo should prevail with ease having beaten Kiptoo comprehensively in Monaco recenthly, more so of a Mo vs the clock  affair and his devastating form suggests that he should surge inside 7:30 anytime now. Therefore, I can’t really see how Moorcroft’s mark could possibly survive a potential onslaught by Mo today. On the other hand, Mohammed Mourhit‘s European record of 7:26.62 may prove a tough nut to break but nothing could be ruled out.

Women’s 4x100m

I don’t know what the line-ups of the US’s Stars & Stripes or Jamaica are going to be but there are several top sprinters from both countries down for the sprints to pick from, so that could make a very interesting race ahead of Daegue where gold is expected to be decided mainly between the two sides. Britain are competiting through two different quartets but Jeanette Kwakye and Laura Turner have already ruled themselves out.

Men’s 100m

As fortune would have it, neither Tyson Gay nor Asafa Powell, who withdrew due to a groin injury a few hours ago, are going to make the starting line of the men’s dash dealing the finishing blow to what was supposed to shape the climax and the highlight of the meeting a few months ago. Therefore, spectators and viewers will ‘have to do’ with a less glamorous affair between Nesta Carter (JAM), Yohan Blake (JAM), Mike Rodgers (USA), Daniel Bailey (ANT) and Richard Thompson (TRI) that could make for a tight enthralling sprint tussle nevertheless, surprisingly most of them in a packed second semi earlier on.

Which, in turn, is going to make the task of Marlon Devonish and Mark Lewis-Francies, in an effective run-off for the third remaining dash spot in the British team, particularly tough to make it through to the final later on, more likely the better of them as a fastest loser. Ricky Fifton is a late addition to this one.

By contrast, Harry Aikines-Ayreety has got a far better chance in the first semi, mainly against Blake, Trell Kimmons (USA) and an inconsistent Keston Bledman (TRI), as Dwain Chambers‘s exile continues due to a substantially groundless and senseless now policy upheld by the organisers. Craig Pickering also goes in this one out in lane eight.

Men’s 110m hurdles

This is building up very much as a dress rehearsal, minus former Olympic champion Liu Xiang (CHN), to what looks now like the ultimate showdown of the World Championships in Daegu as David Oliver and Dayron Robles engage in an anticipated fiercesome and breathtaking decisive encounter over the sticks, where gaining a pcychological edge and boost may be worth well more than prize money at the far end of it. Nevertheless, there is a menacing new force that emerges large on the global scene in the shape of new American star Jason Richardson, who stunned Oliver in Monaco and will fancy his chances of running away with the spoils.

Andy Turner will be looking to close the gap further on them, hopefully dipping into the 13.1 secs, while Lawrence Clarke, William Sharman and Gianni Frankis will be fighting it out for the remaining two places on the British team.

Men’s 400m

Martyn Rooney goes into this one looking to land the A qualifying standard that will fully ensure him of a berth to Daegu and will have to do it the hard way as he has been handed the outside lane, meaning running blind with a strong field inside him even if neither Lashawn Merritt or Jeremy Warriner, who will miss the rest of the season, will be among them. Germaine Gonzales (JAM), great hurdler Angelo Taylor (USA), Christopher Brown (BAH) and prodigy Kirani James (GRN) are expected to set up a thrilling race in the 44 secs region, with in very good form European champion Kevin Borlee also involved.

Women’s 800m

This is effectively the UK Trials race even if nearly a week late save Jenny Meadows who is the only to have secured her place and will be solely focussed on gaining a valuable win over the likes of in-form Kenia Sinclair (JAM),  Irina Maracheva (RUS) and Molly Beckwith (USA), as well as a fast time heading to Daegu. Tara Bird will be pacemaking this one and anyone among Emma Jackson, Marilyn Okoro, returning Jemma Simpson and Lindsay Sharp that finishes inside 1:59.80 and in an incorporated top domestic three will be guaranteed a place.  Otherwise, it will boil down to the ‘shootout’ of B standards.

Men’s 5000m

Just before his ‘best half ‘ makes or breaks in the women’s 800m, Chris Thompson will be venturing on a similar mission to claim the A qualifying standard in a late-inserted race over the distance, where the presence of Kenyan Titus Kipjumba Mbishei and Aussie Craig Mottrah will ensure of a good sustained pace. Andy Vernon may still hold hopes of sneaking under the B standard.

Men’s Long Jump

Reigning world champion Dwight Phillips has withdrawn but there is still a stern test awaiting Chris Tomlinson and Greg Rutherford, both having enjoyed excellent seasons so far, as they will be squaring off with in-hot-form Mitchell Watt (AUS), Olympic champion Irving Saladino (PAN) and Gontsho Mokoena (RSA) in an anticipated pulsating encounter. The recent British record of 8.35m from Tomlinson could go either way where new UK champion Julian Reid is also in looking for a late B standard.

Men’s 800m

This could turn a cracker in so many aspects as last year’s top global athlete David Rudisha clashes with Abubaker Kaki, who has been ranging well beyond his regular distance boundaries lately and it will be interesting to see the effects. American Nick Symmonds and Kenyan Boaz Lalang are two more individuals to watch out for and in good form while I sense that Andie Osagie is poised to take his game into new territories running off such high quality rivals. Muchtar Mohammed will be looking to follow up on his breakthrough 1:45.90 win in Sweden midweek and make it a full quota of athletes for Britain in the event while Welshman Gareth Warburton gets a chance to improve on his own SB substantially.

Women’s 200m

Britain’s teenage sensation Jodie Williams makes her Diamond League debut, has got a great lane in three and will be looking to make the most of some high qualify opposition involving US champion Shalonda Solomon to tear inside Kathy Smallwood-Cook‘s long-standing U20 record of 22.70 since 1979 – always weather-permitting. The American should be a hot favourite to clinch the race.

Women’s Pole Vault

I’ve got a sneaky feeling that sensational Holly Bleasdale could stage a major upset here in a contest that is very much a dress rehearsal of the World Championships in Daegu save Yelena Isinbayeva. and Anna Rogowska (POL). She’s fresh from a huge UK record of 4.70m and a European U23 title, so on a momentum right now, but what has intrigued me is that she cleared that very height at a warm-up attempt in Ostrava to hint that there is a lot more in the tank for her.

Kate Dennison will be also eyeing to improve on her recent PB of 4.61m as she has turned a page into her career while Jenn Suhr (USA), Fabianna Murer (BRA), Martina Struntz (GER), Svetlana Feofanova (RUS) and Nikol Kyriakopouloy (GRE) will be among a top tier field.

Women’s 400m hurdles

Perri Shakes-Drayton looks rampant on the back of a flat/hurdles 400m double at the UK Trials and will be brimming with confidence and form heading into a high level clash with Zuzana Hejnova (CZE), Kaliese Spencer (JAM) and Olympic champion Melaine Walker (JAM), with a sub 54 time beckoning at the finish line. Eilish Child, facing the tough outside lane, is on the verge of a breakthrough inside 55 secs and hopefully she will be on the other side of it shortly today.

Women’s Javelin

Barbora Spotakova (CZE) locks horns with Christina Obergfoll (GER) once again as both will be aiming in the high 60s while Goldie Sayers will hope to return to the mid 60m region and hopefully pick off one of the two, which will be a sound confidence booster.