Greg Rutherford has been long touted to take British long jumping to new realms but a little touch of the art of great Carl Lewis, the undisputed master of the game, seems to launch him towards the heights of his potential.

A tweak on his take-off phase out of the book of the American four-time Olympic champion, overseen by coach Dan Pfaff,  is paying already handsome dividents as he reached a new PB of 8.35m as early as his third showing this season, equalling Chris Tomlinson‘s British record in the process.

After all, Rutherford is a useful sprinter himself, holding a PB of 10.26 secs over 100m, so such a tune-up was always bound to fall in nicely with his gear.

Chula Vista, near San Diego in California, may be widely regarded as a heaven for discus throwers but looks also to turn a happy ground in the case of the 25-year-old Briton who had matched the Olympic A standard of 8.20 (1.2m/sec) on his previous call at the venue a week earlier.

All the same, Rutherford had trouble adapting his run-up on the runway in the early to middle stages as he twice came shy of the board to record 7.89m (2.1m/sec) and 8.02m (1.9m/sec) where he simply ran through when he readjusted on the third effort.

But it all eventually came together in the very next attempt as he rode on a perfect tailwind of 2.0m/sec to land that big new lifetime best and sweep to the summit of the global rankings, erasing a previous marker of 8.30m that stood since the qualifying round in Berlin in 2009.

Suffice it to say that such a distance raises him as a genuine medal contender in London and he apparently felt content with his day work to pass on his last couple of attempts and save for more demanding occasions later into the season.

Surveying the scene from a largely new perspective, the co-British record holder is turning now his sights firmly on his first serious mission of the season at the opening leg of the new Diamond League in Doha, Qatar, where he will be aiming to establish himself in the driving seat of the event early on the way to the Olympics.

Also lining up will be Tomlinson himself to set up a first head-to-head at the forefront of the British scene although it might be a journey into the unknown to an extent for the latter on his first outing since the final in Daegu early last September.

An operation and a consequent delayed build-up due to a lengthy rehabilitation stretching into the winter spelt a later opener to the season and the European bronze medallist could just be looking to get a feel of his current shape and regain his footing on the international stage before he engages higher gears.

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